Agnes Meyer-Brandis


Agnes Meyer-Brandis, born in 1973, first studied Mineralogy at the RWTH Aachen. After one year she transferred to the Art Academy Maastricht, Netherlands to study Sculpture. From 1996 to 2000 she belonged to in the master class at the Art Academy Düsseldorf. After a working stay in New York she attended the Academy of Media Arts Köln from 2001 to 2003. She was awarded to various scholarships and prizes, e.g.: Villa Aurora resident Los Angeles 2010 Artist in Residence, National Center for Contemporary Art (NCCA) Ekaterinburg & Moscow, 2009/Russia HMKV, Hartware MedienKunstVerein, NRW grant, 2009/Germany, Goethe Institute, Porto Alegre, grant, 2006/Brazil, transmediale06 winner first price 2006/Germany // Kunstraum Aarau, Science & Cite Award, winner first price / 2005/Switzerland, Kunststiftung NRW, grant, Prix Ars Electronica, honorary mention, 2007 and 2003/Austria. Numerous single and group exhibitions: 2009 "Biennale am Ende der Welt", Argentinien, „Art On Site”, 3rd Moscow Biennale, National Center for Contemporary Art (NCCA) Moskau, Russland 2004 “Transmitter“, emaf - European Media Art Festival, Kunsthalle Osnabrück; 2004 BEAP - Biennale of Electronic Arts, Perth, Australia; 2005 Kunstraum Aarau, Schweiz; Kunstraum Düsseldorf; Gallery Kapelica, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
http://www.transmediale.de/agnes-meyer-brandis


Recent article on AMB here:
http://rhizome.org/editorial/2012/feb/8/agnes-meyer-brandis-moon-goose-analogue-lunar-migr/

Agnes Meyer-Brandis


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In her career, Agnes Meyer-Brandis has engaged in fine arts and new media. Her works presented and praised at international exhibitions describe a journey at the joint of art and science and research the boundary between fact and fiction, fantasy and technology. She similarly devotes herself to places and situations both public and imaginary. Agnes Meyer-Brandis is the founder of the Research Raft for Subterranean Reefology u.V. ("Forschungsfloß FFUR"), a small institute that carries out research focused on investigating and studying underground phenomena and forms of life.

Agnes Meyer-Brandis is most famous for her work entitled, The Moon Goose Experiment which is a short documentary video of the MGE experiment, realized in Siberia, Novosibirsk during the Total Solar Eclipse, 1st August, 2008. The project The Moon Goose Experiment (MGE) is based on an excerpt from the book The Man in the Moone, written by the English bishop Francis Godwin in 1603. Godwin was the first person ever to describe weightlessness – long before Newton’s theory of gravity. The protagonist in the book flies to the moon in a chariot towed by gansas birds, more commonly known as geese. These special moon geese migrate every year from the earth to the Moon. The artist equips the space expedition on a sand island in the Siberian river Ob and observes the effect of the total eclipse of the Sun on the behaviour of the moon geese.



The Moon Goose Experiment- A Bio-Poetic Investigation.


external image S51_Moon_Goose_Experiment.jpg


Further Information on The Moon Goose Experiment

Agnes Meyer-Brandis’s poetic-scientific investigations weave fact, imagination, storytelling and myth, past, present and future. In Moon Goose Analogue: Lunar Migration Bird Facility, a major commission, the artist develops an ongoing narrative based on the book The Man in the Moone, written by the English bishop Francis Godwin in 1603, in which the protagonist flies to the Moon in a chariot towed by ‘moon geese’. Meyer-Brandis has actualised this concept by raising eleven moon geese from birth within her project Moon Goose Colony at Pollinaria in Italy; giving them astronauts’ names*, imprinting them on herself as goose-mother, training them to fly and taking them on expeditions and housing them in a remote Moon analogue habitat. (* Neil, Svetlana, Gonzales, Valentina, Friede, Juri, Buzz, Kaguya-Anousheh, Irena, Rakesh, Konstantin-Hermann)
The remote analogue habitat simulates the conditions of the Moon and will be accessed and operated from Meyer-Brandis’s control room installation within the gallery, where instructional videos, photographs and vitrines of the geese’s egg shells and footprints will be displayed.
Meyer-Brandis develops the contested history of Godwin’s original fiction – posthumously and pseudonymously published as if the genuine account of the travels of Domingo Gonsales. She weaves a narrative that explores the observer’s understanding of the fictitious and the factual, with a nod to notions of the believably absurd.
Oxford academic, William Poole [1], in his Preface to the 2009 edition of The Man in the Moone [2], explains the importance of Godwin’s work, “First, it is a work of literary sophistication. It is narrated by a slightly implausible figure who does a number of very implausible things, not least fly to the moon and back.…its supposed time-frame further heightens readerly problems about who and what to trust in this text, and why… its finely integrated discussion of various state-of-the-art ideas about astronomy and cosmology – magnetic attraction, diurnal rotation, and the possibility of interplanetary travel and extraterrestrial life. The dramatisation of these discussions in The Man in the Moone is at once a form of popular science and also a form of popular fiction. This is the age-old problem of fiction – the probable impossible intermingled with the possible improbable."
Moon Goose Analogue: Lunar Migration Bird Facility, 2011 links directly to Meyer-Brandis's, Moon Goose Colony, 2011, a project during her residency at Pollinaria, Italy, the site of the remote analogue habitat where the artist has raised and houses the colony of moon geese.

Moon Goose Analogue: Lunar Migration Bird Facility, 2011 links directly to Meyer-Brandis's, Moon Goose Colony, 2011, a project during her residency at Pollinaria, Italy, the site of the remote analogue habitat where the artist has raised and houses the colony of moon geese.

http://www.artscatalyst.org/projects/detail/moon_goose_analogue_agnes_meyer_brandis/







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Agnes Meyer-Brandis, Moon Goose Colony, Pollinaria, 2011




Moon Goose eggs being placed in an incubator by artists Agnes Meyer-Brandis
Moon Goose eggs being placed in an incubator by artists Agnes Meyer-Brandis

Agnes Meyer-Brandis, Moon Goose Colony, Pollinaria, 2011
Portraits of Moon Geese named after astronaughts, Agnes Meyer-Brandis
Portraits of Moon Geese named after astronaughts, Agnes Meyer-Brandis

Agnes Meyer-Brandis, Moon Goose Colony, Pollinaria, 2011









Agnes Meyer-Brandis, Moon Goose Colony, Pollinaria, 2011
Artist Agnes meyer-Brandis taking her Moon Geese out for an evening walk
Artist Agnes meyer-Brandis taking her Moon Geese out for an evening walk


Agnes Meyer-Brandis, Moon Goose Colony, Pollinaria, 2011
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Analogue: Lunar Migration Bird Facility, Agnes Meyer-Brandis

Agnes Meyer-Brandis Exhibts
Great North MuseumBarras BridgeNewcastle upon TyneNE2 4PT
01/03/2012 – 31/03/2012 Mon – Sat 10am–5pm, Sun 2–5pm
Free
The remote analogue habitat created for the artist's Moon Goose Colony simulates the conditions of the Moon and will be operated from a control room installation within the gallery

Biopoetic investigations – Agnes Meyer Brandis

external image 14_mg_6164.jpg?w=819&h=546Moon Goose Colony, Agnes Meyer Brandis, 2011
The work of artist Agnes Meyer-Brandis creates new stories, at the same time fantastical and believable, through the fusion of detailed factual research and enchanting fiction. Her new work The Moon Goose Analogue: Lunar Migration Bird Facility has been commissioned by The Arts Catalyst for our Republic of the Moon exhibition, which opens at FACT, Liverpool, in December.
Meyer-Brandis studied mineralogy at the University of Aachen, before transferring to the Art Academy in Maastricht, Netherlands, to study sculpture and to the Art Academy in Düsseldorf. For many years, her work explored deep in the dark zone below the earth and ice, fascinated by what lay beneath her feet. In her SGM-Iceberg-Probe, she developed an elegant probe that could be lowered into a bore hole from an exploration tent into the deep layers of the Earth, revealing on a monitor and through headphones the moving images and sounds of subterranean life forms and rocks.
external image sgm-iceberg-probe_fieldtest3.jpg?w=459&h=318SGM Iceberg Probe - field test
external image sonde_screenshot2.jpg?w=446&h=337SGM Iceberg Probe - screenshot
In 2007, she shifted her poetic-scientific investigations to include the skies, exploring birds, clouds, planets and heavenly bodies. In her project //Cloud Core Scanner//, she explored the phenomena of cloud cores in weightlessness with the German Space Agency.
external image agnes-hovering1.jpg?w=502&h=354The artist in weightlessness
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Another popular project was the Public Meteor Watching event that the artist organized outside the National Center For Contemporary Art (NCCA) in Ekaterinburg, Russia, at which hundreds of local people gathered to witness the occurrence and impact of a meteor, predicted from the artist’s calculations, an astonishing demonstration of imagination, organisation and sheer chutzpah.
external image impact_event_12b.jpgPublic Meteor Watching, Agnes Meyer Brandis